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Cast

Hecuba
Andromache
Cassandra
Helen
Talthybius
Menelaus
Alsyanax


Credits

Director

Producers

Executive Producer
Screenplay by
Based on the Drama by
English Translation by
Director of Photography
Film Editing by
Music by
Costume Design by
Art Direction by
Hair Stylist
Makeup Artist
Production Assistant
Special Effects
Name

Katharine Hepburn
Vanessa Redgrave
Genevieve Bujold
Irene Papas
Brian Blessed
Patric Magee
Alberto Sanz


Name

Michael Cacoyannis
aka Mihalis Kakogiannis
Michael Cacoyannis,
Anis Nohra
Josef Shaftel
Michael Cacoyannis
Euripides
Edith Hamilton
Alfio Contini
Russel Woolnough
Mikis Theodorakis
Annalisa Nasalli-Rocca
Nicholas Georgiadis
Adalgisa Favella
Franco Fred(d)a
Derek Haine
Basilio Cortijo


VHS / DVD




Film data

A Joseph Shaftel Production
A Cinerama Realeasing Corporation Presentation
105 minutes
Produced: 1971
Filmed on location in Atienza - Guadalajara - Castilla-La Mancha - Spain

Premiere: September 9, 1971


Synopsis

The women of Troy are devastated. They have lost their city, their menfolk, in the disastrous war fought over the beautiful Helen, spirited from the Greeks and brought to Troy. Hecula, Queen of Troy, is mourning the loss of all she h olds dear. She notes in anguish that her daughter, Cassandra, has gone mad. A virgin, dedicated to the god Apollo, Cassandra is to be given over to the Greek king, Agamemnon; since Apollo has given her the gift of seeing into the future, she knows what she faces, but the donor has added a negative: no one will believe her portents. Andromache, Hecuba’s daughter-in-law, is horrified when she learns that her small son will be torn from her arms and thrown from the ramparts. She rages against her malign destiny, but is forced to accompany her dead husband’s armor as she is sent off to Greece and the man who has claimed her. Helen, the cause of all the suffering, thinks only of saving herself. Arrogant and proud, she plans to win over her former husband but still is made to contend with the anger of the bereft women around her.


Critics' reviews

The New Yorker - 1972
"The flaws in the Michael Cacoyannis film of Euripides' The Trojan Women seem unimportant compared to the simple fact that here is a movie of one of the supreme works of the theatre, and not a disgraceful movie, either. What Euripides did was to look at war's other side, and the view from the losing side was not pomp and glory but cruelty and pain.... Hepburn is splendid when she's angry - when she has an antagonist. Perhaps our awareness of her as Hepburn makes us a little impatient with the weak, resigned side of the character."

Molly Haskell - The Village Voice - 1972
"I must confess that although I found Hepburn and Papas the least convincing as Hecuba and Helen, I found their exchange the most stimulating. In the play's only dialectical interlude, they provided a clash of powerful opposites, if not exactly the opposites Euripides had in mind."

Dave Kehr – Chicago Reader
"Whatever his other virtues, Euripides wasn't a born screenwriter, and Michael Cacoyannis's attempts to make him cinematic only point up the fundamental misguidedness of the project. The cast includes Katharine Hepburn, Irene Papas, Genevieve Bujold, and Vanessa Redgrave, and there is something about this array of formidable figures that suggests a toga remake of The Women."


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