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Cast

Babbie
Gavin
Rob Dow
Dr. McQueen
Thammas
Wearyworld
Margaret
Micah Dow
Jean
Nanny
Lord Rintoul
Evalina
Captain Halliwell
Munn
Carfrae
John Spens
Snecky
Maid


Credits

Director
Executive Producer
Screenplay by


Additional Scenes by

Based on the novel and play by
Director of Photography
Art Direction by
Associate Art Director
Set Decorator
Film Editing by
Sound Recordist
Musical Score
Costume Design by
Makeup Artist
Special Photographic Effects
Assistant Director
Technical Advisor

Name
Katharine Hepburn
John Beal
Alan Hale
Donald Crisp
Lumsden Hare
Andy Clyde
Beryl Mercer
Billy Watson
Dorothy Stickney
Mary Gordon
Frank Conroy
Eily Malyon
Reginald Denny
Leonard Carey
Herbert Bunston
Harry Beresford
Barelowe Borland
May Beatty


Name

Richard Wallace
Pandro S. Bermann
Jane Murfin,
Sarah Y. Mason,
Victor Heerman
Mortimer Offner and
Jack Wagner
Sir James M. Barrie
Henry Garrard
Von Nest Polglase
Carroll Clark
Hobe Erwin
William Hamilton
Clem Portman
Max Steiner
Walter Plunkett
Mel Burns
Vernon Walker
Edward Killy
Robert Watson,
F.R.G.S.


VHS / DVD




Film data

RKO Radio Pictures
110 minutes
Reels: 11
Produced: September 7-November 10, 1934
Filmed on locatin at Fryman Ranch - Laurel Canyon - Hollywood Hills - Los Angeles - California - USA

Premiere: December 28, 1934


Synopsis

Lady Babbie often dresses as a gypsy wench and fraternizes with the poor weavers of the Auld Licht Kirk in the Thrums of 1840. Whenever the weavers begin to rebel against the city manufactures, her guardian, Lord Rintoul, sends soldiers to quell the rebellion, but Babbie always warns them beforehand. During one of these jaunts, she meets Gavin Dishart, the conservative new minister of the kirk. After and irritable beginning, the two become fast friends and soon find themselves in love.


Critics' reviews

Richard Watts Jr. - New York Herald Tribune - 1934
"There is little doubt that the star (Hepburn) is one of the major wonder workers of Hollywood, win an unconquerable gift for turning lavender and old lace into something dramatic vitality and conviction. Looking her handsomest and performing with considerable radiance, Miss Hepburn provides The Little Minister with much of the charm that went into the miracle of Little Women."

Andre Sennwald - The New York Times - 1934
"Although dear Babbie's elfin whimsies are likely to cause minor teeth-gnashing among unsympathetic moderns, Miss Hepburn plays the part with likable sprightliness and charm. In its mild-mannered and sober way, The Little Minister proves to be a photoplay of genuine charm."




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