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Cast

Grant Matthews
Mary Matthews
Spike McManus
Kay Thorndyke
Jim Conover
Sam Thorndyke
Sam Parrish
Lulubelle Axelander
Judge Alexander
Bill Hardy
Grace Orval Draper
Senator Lauerback
Norah
Buck
Joyce
Grant, Jr.
Bellboy
Barber
Waiter
Blink Moran
Leith
Jenny
First Reporter
Blonde Girl
Wrestler
Senator
Pilot
Politician
Joe Crandall
Rusty Miller
Broder
Bradbury
Crump
Josephs
Editor


Credits

Director
Producer
Associate Producer
Screenplay by

Based on the play by

Director of Photography
Art Direction by
Associate Art Director
Set Decorator
Film Editing by
Sound Recordist
Musical Score
Costume Design by
Special Effects
Assistant Director
Name

Spencer Tracy
Katharine Hepburn
Van Johnson
Angela Lansbury
Adolpe Menjou
Lewis Stone
Howard Smith
Maidel Turner
Raymond Walburn
Charles Dingle
Florence Auer
Pierre Watkin
Margaret Hamilton
Irvin Bacon
Patti Brady
Georges Nokes
Carl Switzer
Tom Pedi
Tom Fadden
Charles Lane
Art Baker
Rhea Mitchell
Arthur O’Conell
Marion Martin
Tor Johnson
Stanley Andrews
Dave Willock
Russell Meeker
Frank L. Clarke
David Clarke
Dell Henderson
Edwin Cooper
Davidson Clark
Francis Pierlot
Brandon Beach


Name

Frank Capra
Frank Capra
Anthony Veiller
Anthony Veiller,
Myles Connolly
Howard Lindsay,
Russel Crouse
George J. Folsey
Cedric Gibbons
Urie McCleary
Emile Kuri
William Hornbeck
Douglas Shearer
Victor Young
Irene
A. Arnold Gillespie
Arthur S. Blake Jr.


VHS / DVD




Film data

Liberty Film Production
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
124 minutes
Produced: September 29-December 6, 1947

Premiere: April 4, 1948


Synopsis

Mary Matthews joins her estranged husband-candidate Grant to bolster his political chances for the Republican nomination by pretending they enjoy a happy marriage. Pushed by people like Kay Thorndyke, a shrewd newspaperman's daughter, who also loves him, and Jim Conover, a sharp old-line politician, Grant gradually sacrifices all of his principles in favor of his 'White House fever'.


Trailer




Critics' reviews

John McCarten – The New Yorker – 1948
"When "State of the Union most closely follows the Lindsay Crouse play from which it derives, if is a fairly enjoyable business, but then it lights out on its own, it becomes a manages to say as if she meant them such lines as 'Grant likes to get up on the mountains and slap the hurricanes down.'"

Dave Kehr – Chicago Reader
"A wheezy populist parable from Frank Capra's declining years. Spencer Tracy is running from national office, playing along with a group of questionable backers (led by Angela Lansbury) until wife Katharine Hepburn convinces him to stand up for his principles. The public humiliation scene – always an integral part of Capras’ comedies – seems unusually sadistic this time, and most of the gags are drowned by the pompous political sermonizing. A footnote to the Hepburn-Tracy myth, better left to the hard-core."

Geoff Andrew – Time Out
"An over-long and over-emphatic political satire, in which Tracy's presidential candidate enlists the help of his estranged wife (Hepburn) in order to present a happy, respectable front to the voters (as always with Capra, seen as gullible little people, here in danger of being duped by corrupt industrialists). It's the usual Capra recipe of homespun sentiment and mindless optimism, enlivened a little by the performances (though one can only dream of what Cukor might have done with Hepburn and Tracy), but turned unusually bitter by Cold War cracks. Horrible dated, too."


What Kate had to say

In treatment


What fellow actors, the director and friends had to say

Angela Lansbury
"I remember her saying, "I can't stand having to wear high heels but I have to wear them with these skirts." She wore space shoes when nobody else did. You went to a special man and he took a cast of your feet. A lot of rather strange long-haired intellectuals wore them, but Katharine wore them, too."


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