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Working Title: A Love Story

Cast

Clara Wieck Schumann
Robert Schumann
Johannes Brahms
Franz Liszt
Professor Wieck
Bertha
Julie
Felix
Marie
Eugenie
Ludwig
Ferdinand
Elsie
Dr. Hoffman
Haslinger
Princess Valerie Hohenfels
Judge
King Albert
Reinecke
Court Officer
Lady in Box


Credits

Director
Producer
Screenplay by



Based on a story by

Director of Photography
Art Direction by
Associate Art Director
Set Decorator
Film Editing by
Sound Recordist
Musical Score
Piano Recordings
Orchestra
Conductor
Chorus
Musical Advisor
Costume Supervision
Women’s Costumes
Men’s Costumes
Makeup Artist
Hair Stylist
Assistant Director
Special Effects
Name

Katharine Hepburn
Paul Henreid
Robert Walker
Henry Daniell
Leo G. Caroll
Else Hanssen
Gigi Perreau
'Tinker' Furlong
Ann Carter
Janine Perreau
Jimmie Hunt
Anthony Sydes
Eilene Janssen
Roman Bohnen
Ludwig Stossel
Tala Birell
Kurt Katch
Henry Stephenson
Konstanin Shayne
Byron Fougler
Josephine Whittell


Name

Clarence Brown
Clarence Brown
Ivan Tors,
Irmgard Von Cube,
Allen Vincent,
Robert Ardrey
Bernhard Shubert,
Mario Silva
Harry Stradling
Cedric Gibbons
Hans Peters
Edwin B. Willis
J. Kern
Douglas Shearer
Bronislau Kaper
Arthur Rubenstein
MGM Symphony Orchestra
William Steinberg
St. Luke's Boy Choir
Laura Dubman
Irene
Walter Plunkett
Valles
Jack Dawn
Sydney Guilaroff
Al Raboch
Warren Newcombe


VHS / DVD




Film data

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
119 minutes
Produced: November 5, 1946-January 30, 1947

Premiere: October 9, 1947


Synopsis

Despite their poverty and her parents' objections, strong-willed Clara Wieck, a brilliant pianist, weds a struggling and unappreciated composer, Robert Schumann. After several years, she retires to devote her entire life to him and their seven children. The young Johannes Brahms comes to live and study with the Shumanns and ultimately falls in love with Clara.


Trailer




Critics' reviews

Time - 1947
"Mrs. Hepburn portrays Clara with skill and feeling. She is fascinating to watch at the piano, using the clawlike 19th Century Style; her ‘reaction’ to the men’s music, in various dramatic contexts, are the backbone of the picture…. The lives and the music are somewhat distorted, as is usual – an never entirely forgivable – in such pictures. But this is how Brahms and the Schumanns might very possibly have acted if they had realized that later on they would break into the movies."


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